Re: [NFC] Oscilloscopes
From: Peter Rychel (dino308gt4hotmail.com)
Date: Mon, 7 Jun 2021 20:50:00 -0700 (PDT)

Thank you very much Rick, Anthony and George for these recommendations and advice.

 

I knew this was the best place to get this info.

 

Peter

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

From: Rick Moseley
Sent: June 7, 2021 8:11 AM
To: Peter Rychel
Cc: The FerrariList
Subject: Re: [Ferrari] [NFC] Oscilloscopes

 

Peter, 

If space and power are not an issue, I'd look for an older Tektronix CRT scope.  I still use a 30yo 4 channel 300Mhz scope that drifts less than .01% every time I get it re-calibrated.  You can pick one up used for $300.  You should be able to get it calibrated for about $100 and for a home gamer be good for 5 years.

 

If you want something newer and more compact, do the research and there are some older Rigol scopes that can be hacked to permanently upgrade their function specs.  Rigol was making full featured scopes and using the same hardware but sold as lesser machines that were software crippled.   Someone figured out the hack to permanently make them the best model.  I had one for a couple of years but sold it and don't remember the particulars.

 

Automotive:

 

If you are looking for something geared toward automotive use (drop resistant, grease/oil resistant) and even battery powered, Hantek makes some good little hand held models.  But I find their screens hard to read with old eyes.

 

MicSig makes a good ruggedized tablet style O-scope for automotive use that has lots of probe choices to make automotive use very simple.   If you get a touch screen type scope, just be sure to get a good screen protector that you can wipe clean from your greasy fingerprints. 

 

Autel makes a hot little 4 channel scope for the automotive world too.  But, it works with their Maxsys (sp?) scanner head.   So you are looking at a bigger investment than the self contained MicSig.

 

Sadly, all this stuff (other than Tektronix) is made in China

 

As far as speed, anything 100Mhz should be fine for any car work.

 

Rick

 

PS: I'm a Fluke fan, through and through.  I must have 15 different Fluke multi-meters, clamp meters, network scanner/injectors... probably $25K worth.  Love them, lived by them.   I've never been impressed by their "automotive" meters or their scopes.   Just not in their wheelhouse.  The only person I know who still owns a Fluke 88 runs Cosworth... and I've fixed his, twice now.  99% of the time, he's like me...  grab the old Fluke 77.  It's a warhorse!   What does he think of the Fluke 88?  he loaned it to Keegan for a few months....  might as well been a sewing machine.

 

On Sunday, June 6, 2021, 9:32:29 PM PDT, Peter Rychel <dino308gt4 [at] hotmail.com> wrote:

 

 

I’ve always wanted to get an oscilloscope as I feel it can be a handy tool in diagnosing engine running problems, especially with newer fuel injected cars, as the various sensors and controls aren’t simply on or off switches but pulse at very high rates.

 

Obviously the more channels the unit has, the better (although cost goes up considerably with each channel added). My question is, what minimum frequency should the unit be capable of measuring in order to evaluate say, a fuel injector or ignition coil circuit at near max RPM? 10,000Hz? 100,000Hz?

 

Thanks,

 

Peter

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

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